Deadpool 2 – Film Review

Deadpool does things differently. Fast-talking, gleefully profane and with a fondness for fourth-wall-breaking, the first ‘proper’ outing for the Merc with a Mouth had an outrageous spirit that pulled the pants down on its fellow oh-so-serious comic book movies. And did it with a wink and a smirk.

So it follows that Deadpool 2 was never going to bow to convention and follow its record-breaking predecessor by going bigger, badder and darker. Instead, it takes a katana to the rule book and just keeps doing what Deadpool does best. Namely, delivering a ferociously filthy and wildly entertaining antidote to the usual fate-of-the-world superhero formula.

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With John Wick’s David Leitch at the helm (replacing Tim Miller), Deadpool 2 has a slick, confident swagger. The restless stream of gore, dick jokes and meta put-downs are ballsier, cleverly and cruelly taking down rival superhero universes, Deadpool’s own messy cinematic history and featuring what’s quite possibly the most disturbing Basic Instinct gag ever committed to film. The giddy kinetic action sequences, meanwhile, have an inventive verve, including a comically catastrophic road heist that’s so ruthlessly violent, even Thanos would be watching from between his big meaty purple paws.

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That’s mightily impressive given Deadpool spends most of the movie in a massive funk. Having reunited with fiancée Vanessa (Morena Baccarin) and found a living using his unique brand of crime fighting, Wade is ready to start a family. But when that chance is ripped away from him by tragedy, he sinks into a deep depression. Ryan Reynolds struggles to sell these bleaker moments, which jar with the movie’s otherwise haywire energy. Watching Wade mourn, you’ll find yourself waiting for a punchline that never comes to undercut the mood. That’s because the character development doesn’t ring true, the transition from ultimate loner to doting father-to-be coming without explanation, and Wade’s pain lacks impact as a result.

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Fortunately, Wade quickly finds a new family when a grizzled super solider with a “Winter Soldier arm” travels from the future to kill a super-powered child, and Deadpool forms the X-Force to help take him down. Once Deadpool has a fresh batch of super buddies to riff off of, the movie really finds its stride. Zazie Beetz is enjoyably invincible as ‘lucky’ Domino; Rob Delaney makes an adorable cameo as the sweetly non-super-powered Peter; and with Cable, Josh Brolin continues to show he has a knack for imbuing unstoppable Marvel baddies with wit, charm and uncommon vulnerability.

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The cynical view might be to say that this simply serves to set-up a future universe of inter-connected franchises (an X-Force movie is already in development). Yet this is still Reynolds’ movie and a role that fits him like a tailor-made spandex suit, providing the perfect vehicle for his juvenile charm and hyperwit. So whether its slicing up scoundrels while wearing stilettos or tea-bagging a time-travelling robot hitman, whatever Deadpool does next, it’s sure to be something different.

Runtime: 119 mins (approx.)
Director: David Leitch
Screenwriters: Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick, Ryan Reynolds
Cast: Ryan Reynolds, Josh Brolin, Zazie Beetz, Morena Baccarin

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Avengers: Infinity War – Film Review

“The fate of the universe is at stake,” warns Doctor Strange, early on in Avengers: Infinity War. That’s no overstatement. The first of a two-part story – an untitled Avengers 4 is due next year – that’s widely pitched as the endgame for the Marvel Cinematic Universe, this latest superhero mashup promises to bring 10 years and 18 movies of unprecedented world-building to a close with planet-shattering consequences. That’s one hell of a mission statement. Yet Infinity War not only matches its gargantuan ambitions; it smashes through them, delivering Marvel’s most shocking, dramatically hefty movie so far.

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That Avengers prefix is a tad misleading, though. Infinity War might involve pretty much every major character in the MCU, but they’re all overshadowed by the giant, purple-skinned titan who’s finally decided to get off his space toilet and join the fight. A darkly operatic opening sequence immediately dispels any lingering doubts about Thanos’ (Josh Brolin) effectiveness as a villain, with a ruthless demonstration of power grimly kick starting a rampage across the cosmos as he makes a smash-and-grab for the remaining Infinity Stones.

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That he is such a frighteningly formidable foe owes a great deal to the emotional weight Brolin brings to Thanos’ pixelated heft. His plan to exterminate half the universe is completely mad, but it’s powered by traumatic experience and his victories come at great personal cost. He suffers for his cause and the unimaginable lengths he’s prepared to go to succeed in his mission make him a far more compelling villain than we’re used to seeing in the MCU.

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It’s this unflinching determination that sets Thanos apart from the splintered band of heroes who try to stop him. “We don’t trade lives,” Steve Rodger’s (Chris Evans) nobly claims at one point in the movie – Thanos spends most of the near-150 minute runtime testing that conviction. Time and again the Avengers are forced to chose between saving a life and doing what’s necessary to win, a constant turmoil that drags them into dark, challenging places as they confront their deepest demons. Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr) comes face to face with the monster who has tormented him since the Chitauri invasion of New York. Doctor Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) has to consider how far he’s prepared to go to keep his promises. Thor (Chris Hemsworth) doubts how much more he can bear to lose. Is the price of being a hero one any of them are willing to pay?

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For all the bleak, existential quandaries, this is still a Marvel movie – so there’s plenty of levity shining through the darkness. The fractured, disparate nature of the heroes leads to several delightfully unusual combinations. The meeting of egos between Stark and Strange certainly doesn’t disappoint. Thor’s unexpected arrival aboard the Guardian’s ship is another hilarious highlight, as is his amusingly accurate retelling of his family history. And Tom Holland continues to prove he’s the best on-screen Spider-Man yet with his naive exuberance landing some of the film’s best lines.

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Naturally, not every thing works perfectly. With such a massive cast, it’s unsurprising that several characters struggle to make an impact – the Children of Thanos fail to register as anything more than surprisingly handy henchman – and it feels like directors Anthony and Joe Russo are pulling their punches with some of the bigger plot twists. These minor quibbles feel just that, though, when the rest of the film is such a bold, exciting spectacle. That’s especially true as the movie enters its thrilling endgame, culminating in perhaps the most strikingly inviting of cliffhangers since Han Solo was dipped in carbon. Think Infinity War is the end of the Marvel Universe? On this basis, it’s just getting started.

Runtime: 149 minutes (approx.)
Directors: Anthony and Joe Russo
Screenwriters: Christopher Markus, Stephen McFeely
Stars: Josh Brolin, Robert Downey Jr, Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth

Red Sparrow – Film Review

Following a conflicted ballerina-turned-Russian spy, it’s no wonder Marvel fans were hoping Red Sparrow could be the Black Widow origin story they’ve been longing for when it was first unveiled. But Francis Lawrence’s unflinchingly brutal thriller is not that movie. Rather, it’s a densely-plotted, punishing and often troubling watch that’s far removed from the brightly action-packed world of comic book blockbusters.

That being said, Lawrence certainly kicks-starts the action in eye-catching fashion, crisply cross-cutting between the final stage performance of gifted ballerina Dominika (Jennifer Lawrence, no relation) and CIA agent Nate Nash’s (Joel Edgerton) neatly choreographed meet with a government mole. It’s one of many slickly-paced set-pieces in a beautifully shot movie, operatically building tension towards a crushing crescendo that sees Nash scarpering to the nearest embassy while Dominika lays sprawled on the stage, her leg shattered.

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Struggling to pay her crippled mother’s medical bills and facing eviction from her apartment after the destruction of her dance career, Dominika reluctantly accepts an offer from her calculating uncle Ivan to become a government operative. She’s despatched to Sparrow School, a secret training camp where elite agents are taught to weaponise their sexuality to seduce targets and extract valuable information for the government. Her first mission: gain Nash’s trust and uncover the identity of his secret informant.

Arriving in the shadow of the #MeToo movement, the idea of an intelligent young woman being forced to commoditise her body in the service of powerful men will likely prove controversial for some. Especially when considering the film’s uncomfortably graphic depiction of sexual violence in several scenes. Dominika’s first steps into the seedy world of global espionage are particularly hard to handle as she’s subjected to a dehumanising training regime, forced to strip naked and perform sexual acts in front of her classmates. In these moments, she has no agency of her own – she’s merely a chess pawn at the mercy of domineering men.

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As the story develops, though, and Dominika grows coldly accustomed to her role in extracting information from willing targets, there’s a sense of her taking control, using her training to deceive both Nash and her government minders in order to survive in a cruel, unforgiving working environment. Whether such a muddy, complicated take on sexual politics can be viewed as satisfyingly empowering, will likely dictate your enjoyment of this movie.

One thing that won’t be up for debate is Lawrence’s mesmerising performance. Justin Haythe (Revolutionary Road) has adapted Jason Matthew’s novel (the first of three) into a tightly-woven, if slightly uneven, tale of double crossings and fraught alliances, but casting Lawrence in the lead role elevates an otherwise ordinary thriller into something truly compelling.

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Cooly enigmatic while remaining remarkably empathetic, Lawrence throws herself into the role and is utterly convincing – hammy Russian accent aside – as she teases her shifting loyalties between her country and the CIA. Meanwhile, Edgerton brings some much needed depth to the one-note role of dependable CIA agent Nash, forming a believable chemistry with his co-star.

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For the most part, Lawrence the director orchestrates proceedings with a cool detachment and clean camera work, but proves he’s more than capable of raising the pulse when required. A tense hand-over of incriminating floppy discs in a London hotel is confidently handled, while a later exchange set on a Hungarian airstrip sees Lawrence display an almost Hitchcockian mastery of suspense-building and dramatic reveals. It’s that kind of skillet that would make him an excellent choice to helm a Black Widow move… if Marvel ever gets around to making one.

Runtime: 139 min (approx.)
Director: Francis Lawrence
Screenwriter: Justin Haythe
Stars: Jennifer Lawrence, Joel Edgerton, Matthias Schoenaerts, Charlotte Rampling

Black Panther – Film Review

Think of Black Panther and one thing comes to mind. As the first black superhero movie, much of the noise surrounding its release has focused on the landmark statement of intent it makes for inclusivity in Hollywood. Quite rightly, too, given that, for all its recent forays into far away galaxies, quantum realms and astral planes, the MCU has remained tightly bound to its white male superstars. Yet perhaps Black Panther’s greatest achievement is that, once you’ve settled down with your popcorn and gallon-sized cup of cola, you’ll forget all about the game-changing importance of its mere existence. Instead, you’ll simply be blown away by a searingly intelligent, exhilaratingly well-crafted piece of filmmaking.

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After a potted Wakandan history lesson, which cleverly establishes the secretive, technologically advanced nation while laying the seeds for an engaging mix of geopolitical thriller and complex family drama, we arrive in the aftermath of Captain America: Civil War. With his father murdered in a bomb-attack, T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) returns home to be officially crowned Wakanda’s king and super-powered protector Black Panther. His rule is immediately beset by challenges, however, as rivals line up to take his crown and political tensions quietly simmer between his most trusted advisors. When his kingdom comes under threat from canon-armed weapons smuggler (a gleefully unhinged Andy Serkis) and a rogue US black-ops solider, Black Panther is forced into action to protect his throne and Ulysses Klaue stop the world from discovering Wakanda’s secrets.

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What is immediately striking is writer-director Ryan Coogler’s (Creed) emphasis on eschewing reductive African stereotypes, particularly in the vivid, jaw-droppingly detailed realisation of Wakanda itself. A lively, Afro-futurist utopia, the hidden nation is a thriving metropolis, boasting advanced medicine and superior weaponry thanks to an abundance of vibranium laying beneath its lands. Coogler grounds these fantastical elements by throwing in plenty of African cultural influences, with separate languages, shirtless ritual combat and brightly-attired tribal leaders, serving to compliment a richly complex landscape that feels wholly unique, and yet entirely believable.

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Such an intricate cultural backdrop allows Coogler to touch on several weighty political issues. While Wakanda has remained hidden for decades in order to protect its resources, many of its tribal leaders disagree over whether this remains the best course of action as the outer world dives deeper into turmoil. Is the country safer on its own or as part of a global community? Does it have a moral obligation to share its wealth with poorer nations? Coogler poses many difficult questions in the kind of powerfully thought-provoking drama not seen since Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy.

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While its themes run deep, Black Panther offers plenty of ferociously paced, dizzyingly exhilarating action sequences to keep its Marvel rivals on their toes. From a chaotically inventive brawl in a South Korean casino, to a wildly intense car chase through neon-lit city streets, to a heart-poundingly brutal fight atop a cascading waterfall between T’Challa and Michael B Jordan’s highly-skilled Killmonger, the movie offers plenty of whizz-bang for its buck.

That latter sequence is so gut-wrenchingly tense at least in part due to the powerful, commanding presence of Jordan’s Killmonger – one of Marvel’s best villains in a long while. Although viciously monomaniacal in his intentions, there’s an understandable, deeply emotional rationale to his desire to use Wakanda’s technology to arm the world’s oppressed minorities. Jordan sells Killmonger’s unflinching commitment to his cause with a bitter, savage swagger that neatly contrasts Boseman’s poised assuredness.

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As good as they are, though, there’s a number of charismatic supporting players who threaten to steal the show from underneath them. Daniel Kaluuya is quietly composed as W’Kabi, the leader of Wakanda’s Border Tribe, while Danai Gurira is confidently aggressive as Okoye, head of the all-female special forces team that protects T’Challa. Meanwhile, Letitia Wright enlivens every scene as T’Challa’s cheekily intelligent, tech-savvy little sister Shuri, who builds and develops all of Wakanda’s tech. What makes them all so compelling is that every one of them posseses an emotionally engaging throughline – W’Kabi is frustrated at his king’s failure to catch his parents’ killer, while Okoye finds herself torn between her heart and her sense of duty – and Coogler ensures everyone gets their moment to shine.

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Yes, there are flaws. Some of the early action sequences are clumsily edited and the climatic battle suffers from Marvel’s usual overload of CGI gadgetry and giant creatures. But at a time when MCU movies have becoming increasingly cookie-cutter in style and tone, Black Panther dares to be different. It delivers glorious visuals, insane action sequences and an absorbing, complex story filled with rich, fully-rounded characters that elevates the superhero genre to extraordinary new heights. It’s mightily impressive.

Runtime: 134 mins (approx.)
Director: Ryan Coogler
Screenwriters: Ryan Coogler, Joe Robert Cole
Stars: Chadwick Boseman, Michael B Jordan, Danai Gurira, Latitia Wright

Spider-man: Homecoming – Film Review

After six movies and two reboots in the last 15 years – not to mention a further 16 outings for Marvel’s other heavy hitters since 2008 – fans could be forgiven for growing weary at the thought of yet another Spider-man movie. Thankfully, Spider-man: Homecoming repays audience persistence in spades.

Having already wowed fans with his zingy and zestful cameo in Captain America: Civil War, Tom Holland’s first full outing as the web slinging crime fighter deftly walks a tricky tightrope between paying heed to the larger Marvel machine and offering a fresh and revitalising spin on the typical comic book movie template.

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By far the film’s best move is skipping Spidey’s tired-and-tested origin story, with which we’re already far too familiar. Unburdened by the shackles of dead parents, murdered uncles, cute neighbours and radioactive spider bites, we’re free to jump straight into the action.

Picking up right after that almighty skirmish over the Skovia Accords, 15-year-old Peter Parker is dropped back in Queens by his new mentor Tony Stark and told to wait by the phone for another call to join up with the Avengers. Cut to two months later: Peter’s heard nothing from Stark and his reluctant minder Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau) isn’t returning any of his texts, leaving Peter to act like ‘a friendly neighbourhood Spider-man’, catching petty thieves and helping old ladies with directions in return for deep-fried Mexican treats.

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Scaling back the influence of the larger Marvel universe proves to be a masterstroke. Though Downey Jr’s Stark featured heavily in the promos, his appearances here are minimal and fit seamlessly into the story. And with the wider MCU taking a backseat, there’s plenty of room for us to get to know our new hero in greater depth than ever before. The result is something more akin to a high school comedy than a superhero movie as Peter tries to contend with jealous school bullies, getting invited to the cool girl’s party and finding a date for homecoming dance; all the while squeezing a spot of crime fighting between the end of school and his 10pm curfew.

With so much of the focus on the young hero, it’s handy that he happens to be the best on-screen Spider-man thus far. Introduced geeking out in a homemade video after meeting the Avengers, there’s something instantly endearing about Holland’s version of the web slinger. Though he’s gifted with spider-like abilities, he feels entirely relatable. Like any teenager, Peter is reckless, impulsive, dangerously ambitious and refreshingly earnest in his attempts to figure out what kind of person he wants to be.

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He also happens to be appealingly lame as a superhero, struggling to control his powers (understandable, considering he now has more than 500 web settings in his new Stark-modified suit) and frequently falling flat on his face during his hapless attempts to help others. That he remains likeable even when his mistakes have potentially fatal consequences is in no small part due to Holland’s cheeky and heartfelt performance.

Drawing sparky performances out of talented youngsters is quickly becoming a calling card of director Jon Watts. Having caught the eye with revenge thriller Cop Car, which deftly balanced gripping thrills with dark humour, Watts brings a similar lightness of touch to proceedings here. The freshman humour is uproariously on point – there’s a great Ferris Buller gag – and even the action sequences are peppered with quick-witted one liners.

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Yet Watts appears to struggle when dealing with the larger scale demands of helming a Marvel movie. Many of the big set-pieces, while effective and well-executed, feel far too mundane to make much of an impact. And except for a vertiginous rescue atop the Washington Monument, there’s not a single action sequence that sticks in the memory, which falls far below the level of inventiveness we’ve come to expect of a summer blockbuster.

This lack of whizz-bang visuals is more than compensated for by the presence of a surprisingly compelling villain. Like Peter Parker, Michael Keaton’s Adrian Toomes is an ordinary guy trying to cope with extraordinary circumstances. A former salvager who turns to illegal arms trafficking to support his family, Toomes’ motivation is entirely believable, if not forgivable. Even more so when you consider the political context of his actions – Toomes makes angry speech about rising up against the greedy 1% who keep all the money for themselves – which feels incredibly relevant in the wake of President Trump and Brexit.

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It’s not quite perfect. The final showdown between Toomes and Spider-man inevitably descends into the usual blurry CGI slugfest and many of the female characters are completely without their own purpose or agency. Yet these issues feel like minor quibbles in a movie as fresh and invigorating as this. Ditching the overwhelming superhero angst and sludgy pacing which dogged previous incarnations of the character, and replacing it with a fun and breezy coming-of-age comedy, the youthful Spider-man: Homecoming is the most original comic book movie to swing into cinemas in a very long time.

Runtime: 133 mins

Director: Jon Watts

Screenwriters: Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley

Stars: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr, Jacob Batalon

Iron Fist – TV Review

Be honest: you’d forgotten all about Iron Fist, right? The final recruit to Netflix’s ambitious Defenders team-up had already been bumped to the back of the line after Luke Cage was the breakout star of Jessica Jones and there was truly very little excitement surrounding this belated small screen outing for the little known comic book hero. That feeling is reflected in the series itself which is entirely forgettable from the bland opening credits – think Daredevil but with less blood-soaked Hell’s Kitchen and more inky oriental hand waving. Iron Fist shares all of the flaws of its predecessors but crucially lacks the authentic vision and compelling characters that made Netflix’s previous superhero efforts so watchable.

For the many who are unfamiliar with the comic books, here’s the rub: Danny Rand is the heir to a billionaire family whose parents die when their private jet crashes into the Himalayas. Danny is the only survivor of the crash, pulled from the wreckage by warrior monks who transport him to K’un-Lun, a mythical city which exists in an alternate dimension, where he is trained to become a fierce fighter. Fifteen years later, Danny returns to New York to reclaim his family’s company and fulfil his destiny as the Iron Fist, a legendary figure who can punch really hard… sometimes.

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If that sounds familiar, it’s because we’ve seen this smug-rich-guy-returns-from-Asia-with-superpowers storyline play out countless times before, most recently in Marvel’s Doctor Strange. But Iron Fist can’t boast the same mind-bending visuals that made that Benedict Cumberbatch-starring vehicle such an entertaining ride.

In fact, the show has nothing to offer that we haven’t seen before. The action is slow, clumsy and lacks the brutal tension of Daredevil’s bloody punch-ups. Not one of the dull, by-the-numbers characters manage to make a lasting impression. The plot lacks depth, originality and momentum, staggering along without incident as we wait for something… anything to happen. It can’t even muster a convincing villain for Rand to come up against, instead lumbering us with a tedious power struggle between the newly-returned billionaire and Ward Meachum (Tom Pelphrey), the Patrick Bateman-lookalike who has taken control of Rand’s company in his absence.

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Perhaps such boardroom battles could be compelling if Rand was anything more likeable than a spoiled frat boy. Quite why Finn Jones chose to play Rand as an arrogant, self-aggrandising, tastelessly immature know-it-all is a mystery only he can answer. Perhaps he was just trying to draw attention away from claims his casting was another example of the media whitewashing Asian culture, which, one incident where Rand whitesplains kung-fu to Jessica Henwick’s Japanese-American dojo master aside, prove to be unfounded. At one point Rand, after being shown kindness by a homeless man who brings him food and offers him clothing, laughs to himself and smirks: “I guess people think we’re quite alike.” He really is a “living weapon”.

It’s disappointing because there are shades to Rand that are intriguing. He’s clearly suffered a very traumatising childhood, not just from the plane crash but also from the ritual bullying at the hands of a young Meachum, and the culture shock of returning to New York after 15 years must surely be overwhelming. Yet showrunner Scott Buck never explores these feelings, preferring to pad his scripts with countless flashbacks to the plane crash and forcing Finn to repeatedly yell “I’m Danny Rand” in the hope someone will actually believe him this time.

In short, it’s a wasted opportunity. Free from the pressures of audience anticipation, Iron Fist could’ve cast an Asian lead, or at the very least tapped into the pulpy 70s Kung Fu movies that the original comics tried to rip-off, to create something more uplifting and magical compared to the gritty, urban tone of its predecessors. But Buck never stamps an original personality on this plodding piece, succeeding only in creating a superhero show that will test the patience of even the most committed Marvel fan. So much for saving the best until last.

Legion – TV Review

At a time when it feels like we’ve reached peak-superhero on screens big and small, it takes something truly special to rise above the critical mass of costumes and crossovers and truly make an impact. Legion, erupting from the mind of Fargo’s Noah Hawley, does exactly that. Taking a lesser known character from the X-Men back catalogue, Hawley has somehow crafted a mind-bending trip that eschews the typical superhero formula in favour of something a little more weird.

Though he’s a minor mutant in Marvel’s vast mythology, Dan Stevens’ David Haller, the potentially super-powered hero at the heart of this story, immediately grabs attention. After a happy childhood dissolves into a fractured morass of mental illness, David is diagnosed with apparent paranoid schizophrenia and locked up in Clockworks Psychiatric Hospital. It’s a frightening facility, populated by pale, twitchy patients who have gone dead behind the eyes thanks to a destabilising cocktail of drugs and lack of sunlight. Fortunately for David, his One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest-routine is broken by the arrival of Syd Barrett (Rachel Keller), a new patient with a phobia of touching.

The designs are an off-kilter blend of Wes Anderson’s weirdly retro style and Stanley Kubrick’s perception-altering visuals. Aspect ratios shift, timelines crash and bleed into one another and kitchen utensils erupt out of cupboards with volatile telekinetic force. Even the musical cues are intended to knock your senses off-balance, mixing on point records with Jeff Russo’s brittle and edgy score.

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And that’s entirely in keeping with a show which aims to disorientate and challenging expectations. Legion doesn’t adhere to the villain-of-the-week structure of Arrow or Supergirl, nor does it hit the all-too familiar story beats of Marvel’s Agents of Shield. Instead, Hawley makes his plot deliberately elliptical and misleading, skipping ahead in time at crucial moments before requiring us to piece together what happened as David’s fractured memories leak into the present.

It’s this doubt which forms the basis of the entire series: is David’s ability to manipulate reality with his mind real or just an extension of his paranoid delusions, as the shady, possibly governmental Division is so keen to convince him. Far from being too confusing or exhausting to follow, the first, feature-length episode is a bracing ride from start to finish. After watching so many predictable sci-fi schlock shows of late, it’s exciting to finally see a series that’s determined to challenge what we think we know and keep us guessing to the very end (and possibly beyond).

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It might have been a different story were it not for Dan Stevens’ excellent lead performance. It’s a difficult role for the former Downton Abbey star, whose character’s mood shifts along with his grip on reality. Not only does Stevens pull of this tricky mix of anger, confusion and vulnerability, he also injects an added dose of sardonic charm that makes David a likeable hero even when he is at his most dangerous.

Time will tell if Hawley can sustain such mind-bending storytelling and visual trickery for an entire series and the real test will come when he needs to provide a pay-off to the many mysteries he has posed. But this is as strong a start as it’s possible to make. A surreal, stylish and distinctive origin story that’s teeming with confidence and imagination, Legion is unlike any superhero story we’ve seen. At least that’s one thing we know for sure.